HOW TO PICK YOUR CABIN

There’s no such thing as a bad cabin onboard a cruise ship but if this is your first cruise, then picking the right cabin is important. Things you need to consider include how much you want to spend, whether you get seasick or how close to the action do you want to be? Here are some things to think about when you’re choosing your cabin.


Adjoining cabins

Perfect if you’re in a large group but if you’re not, the extra door between cabins means you can hear loud neighbours. The doors are not soundproof so when booking a cabin, make sure you don’t choose an adjoining cabin unless you’re in a family or large group.


Location for limited mobility

If you’ve got limited mobility, make sure you check where the lifts are when booking your cabin. There is nothing worse than not being near the entry and exit points if you’re using a cane or a walker so it’s essential to see where your cabin is in relation to lifts.


Category 1A Interior stateroom

While these cabins may be great value for money, beware, these are not standard staterooms. Some cruise ships that have these cabins feature one upper and lower berth – essentially, a bunk bed. They also tend to be smaller.


Balconies

Megaships have a range of different cabins. If you’re cruising around places like Alaska or New Zealand, a balcony cabin will give you a great view of your surrounds and you’ll get to spot wildlife like whales breaching from the comfort of your stateroom. Balconies also tend to be larger and will feel even bigger than they are.


Suites

Most luxury ships will have suites and they will all have balconies. This category of accommodation usually also comes with a butler and bespoke services like evening turndown, a pillow menu and a bar fridge stocked with your favourite beverages. The most luxurious accommodations like Owner’s Suites will often have their own living and dining rooms.


Seasickness

If you’re worried about getting seasick on your cruise, request a room on a lower deck as close to the middle as possible. This is the part of the ship where you will feel the least movement.


Noisy cabins

Choose your cabin according to when you like to sleep; unless you’re a party animal or you’re a heavy sleeper, avoid cabins situated near the night club or bars with live music. If you like to sleep late or take afternoon snoozles, steer clear of cabins near the pool deck so you aren't disturbed by children playing near the pool or staff dragging out sun chairs which can make a fair amount of noise in your cabin. Each ship is different, so have a good look at deck plans or ask your travel agent for advice.

HOW TO PICK YOUR CABIN

There’s no such thing as a bad cabin onboard a cruise ship but if this is your first cruise, then picking the right cabin is important. Things you need to consider include how much you want to spend, whether you get seasick or how close to the action do you want to be? Here are some things to think about when you’re choosing your cabin.


Adjoining cabins

Perfect if you’re in a large group but if you’re not, the extra door between cabins means you can hear loud neighbours. The doors are not soundproof so when booking a cabin, make sure you don’t choose an adjoining cabin unless you’re in a family or large group.


Limited mobility

If you’ve got limited mobility, make sure you check where the lifts are when booking your cabin. There is nothing worse than not being near the entry and exit points if you’re using a cane or a walker so it’s essential to see where your cabin is in relation to lifts.


Category 1A Interior stateroom

While these cabins may be great value for money, beware, these are not standard staterooms. Some cruise ships that have these cabins feature one upper and lower berth – essentially, a bunk bed. They also tend to be smaller.


Balconies

Megaships have a range of different cabins. If you’re cruising around places like Alaska or New Zealand, a balcony cabin will give you a great view of your surrounds and you’ll get to spot wildlife like whales breaching from the comfort of your stateroom. Balconies also tend to be larger and will feel even bigger than they are.


Suites

Most luxury ships will have suites and they will all have balconies. This category of accommodation usually also comes with a butler and bespoke services like evening turndown, a pillow menu and a bar fridge stocked with your favourite beverages. The most luxurious accommodations like Owner’s Suites will often have their own living and dining rooms.


Seasickness

If you’re worried about getting seasick on your cruise, request a room on a lower deck as close to the middle as possible. This is the part of the ship where you will feel the least movement.


Noisy cabins

Choose your cabin according to when you like to sleep; unless you’re a party animal or you’re a heavy sleeper, avoid cabins situated near the night club or bars with live music. If you like to sleep late or take afternoon snoozles, steer clear of cabins near the pool deck so you aren't disturbed by children playing near the pool or staff dragging out sun chairs which can make a fair amount of noise in your cabin. Each ship is different, so have a good look at deck plans or ask your travel agent for advice.near the night club or bars with live music. Avoid these cabins and the subwoofer can reverberate through your cabin and often.